Posts Tagged ‘cookies’

Passionfruit melting moments

Through extensive research over the past 25 years it is apparent that everyone loves melting moments. The buttery goodness, with or without icing, is always a favourite.

Here’s the proof:

Case 1: as a young’n’ my Grandma used to make them to take to the oldies home that she volunteered at. And those oldies used to play seriously competitive bingo to win a parcel of them.

Case 2: as a young’n’ I used to go to the oldies home with my Gran and my brother and I would play seriously competitive bingo to try and win a parcel… even if afterwards my Gran made me give them back to the oldies.

Case 3: A semi-young’n’ I used to make them for my dad to take to work in exchange for a bit of pocket money, and the guys in the factory love them on smoko (for non Australians, smoko = morning tea break).

Yep, this is a biscuit for the oldies, young’n’s and the everyday man. Word.

I think there is something in that for all of us.

It should be noted that my Gran’s melting moments had a cocoa based chocolate icing in between them. My Dutch Grandfather had to have chocolate with everything. Not a bad thing. And then my Mum’s melting moments had a melted-chocolate based chocolate icing.

And now I bring you passionfruit.

Ingredients

250 grams butter
½ cup icing sugar
½ cup caster sugar
½ cup custard powder
2 cups plain flour
2 teaspoons of vanilla essence
1 ½ tablespoons of water

Icing

2 passionfruit
Tablespoon of butter
Approx 2 cups of icing sugar – have more on hand.

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees, line cookie trays with baking paper.
  2. Beat the butter and sugars together.
  3. Add custard powder, flour, vanilla essence and water, mix well. The dough will be hold-it’s-own-shape thick.
  4. Take a teaspoon of mixture and roll into a ball. Get them round, you’ll need them a uniform shape for icing. Place on cookie trays and then squish down hard with fork.
  5. Bake for 8 – 10 mins until just golden on the bottom (check by lifting one up with a spatula).
  6. Cool on rack.
  7. To make icing: scoop passionfruit insides into a bowl, add a tablespoon of margarine. Add enough icing sugar so it’s as hold-it’s-own-shape as the dough was. This will be a lot.
  8. To ice, you should be able to put some icing on one biscuit, then roll in between two biscuits to make the icing round, then squish it. This will give it a nice shape.

Note: I did end up with a bit of left over icing, which suits me fine as it freezes well. It’s hard to the quantities just right. If you do, let me know and I’ll update the above.

Quantity: Makes 42 individual biscuits, so 21 sandwiched with passionfruit icing.

Healthy? *snort* maybe in opposites land. One of the biscuits is 86 calories. For the whole thing with icing it is about 223 (depending on your icing quantity).

Storage: No eggs, so they will last. Store in airtight container.

Double chocolate chip cookies


This soft, melt-in-your-mouth double chocolate chip cookie was one of the first things I learnt to make. I guess I was about nine and what I really like is the directions I wrote to myself as I made mistakes. My recipe reads, in wonky handwriting:

“Don’t overcook them or they’ll turn into rocks, they’re better soft”
“Make sure there (sic) completely cooled down before putting in tin”


Thanks nine-year old Aimee. Noted.

Waiting to be cooked

I actually remember the time that I made a double batch and put them into the tin before they’d cooled. I was so excited about the prospect of 48 double chocolate chip cookies I started piling them into a tin just so I could see the chocolatey goodness en masse.

Yeah. Don’t do that. Wait till they’re cooled. Even nine year olds know that.


These are soft and just a little crunchy on the outside. Highly recommended.

Ingredients
125 grams butter, softened
½ cup firmly packed brown sugar
½ cup white sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
1 large egg
1 cup plain flour
4 tablespoons cocoa (or flour if you want to make them plain)
½ teaspoon baking powder
125 grams of dark and/or light chocolate chips, I like to do ½ and ½

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees and line two cookie trays with baking paper.
  2. Beat butter and both sugars together until consistent and creamy looking (note: as a child I know that I didn’t used to beat them together, I just melted the butter and mixed it all together. It worked fine. Not sure why as a, erm, grown up I am going for the more traditional method).
  3. Add egg and vanilla essence and beat together.
  4. Put flour, cocoa and baking powder in your bowl and mix together. Fold in chocolate.
  5. Take a teaspoon of mixture and roll into a bowl, then flatten slightly with a floured fork (again, as a child I just squished it with my hand, no harm done)
  6. Cook for 8-10 minutes, turning half way. 8 minutes is usually plenty, have the guts to pull them out when you think they might be underdone. It’s better that way.
  7. Transfer to wire rack to cool (I didn’t even know what a cooling rack was when I was a kid, so whatever).

Makes 24 fabulous cookies.

Healthy: 125 calories a cookie

Gluten free: Nooo.

Storage: Wait till cool, then in an airtight container. Lasts a week or so, if you can.

Orange marmalade cookies with fresh orange icing

According to a poll taken by me of all residents in my household, 50% prefer jam to marmalade.

The other 50%, and incidentally the smarter 50%, (non-biased poll ranked on who has a blog and who hasn’t) think marmalade is an amazing blend of flavours.

However, all residents like marmalade cookies with fresh orange icing.

Conclusion: If we found the inner cookie in our politicians they’d be more liked.


While reading Rufus’ Food and Spirit Guide I found these awesome looking orange marmalade cookies. I followed the link to the recipe on Sweet Peas blog, and realised it was a reblog from White on Rice Couple’s blog.

And now here! No point reinventing the wheel on something tried and tested. And, may I add, their absolutely delicious.

Except I did reinvent the method. The original method wants you to ‘set your mix master to two’, then refrigerate the batter to harden it, and all that jazz.

Instead I just mixed the batter using a bowl and spoon (totally old school here at Clever muffin). Then used the trusty two-spoon method, taught to me by my mum, to get the sticky cookie batter into balls and on to the tray. In brief – using two spoons, take a spoonful of dough, transfer from one spoon to the other to make a rough ball, then scrape on to tray.

Two spoon trick - not very tricky

It worked just fine. They are a little more rustic looking as I couldn’t roll them in to perfect little ball, but rustic is in. Word. You can always follow the original method by clicking the links above to the other lovely blogs.

You may also notice I made my cookies very big. That’s not trick photography, that’s me wanting really big cookies.

They are more a cake-type-cookie then a crumbly cookie. The term rock cake could describe them aptly.  And moorish. That’s another good word to describe them too.

Ingredients

For the cookie dough:
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs
1 cup orange marmalade
3 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

For the orange icing:
Finely grated zest from 1 orange
Finely grated zest from 1/2 a lemon
1/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1/8 teaspoon sea salt
3 cups icing sugar (confectioners’ sugar)

Method

For the cookie dough:

  1. Preheat oven to 180 C. Line baking trays with grease proof paper.
  2. Cream butter and sugar – either use beaters or work out your biceps (it’s done when it’s a light yellow, smooth texture).
  3. Add eggs, mix well.
  4. Add marmalade, mix well.
  5. Add flour, baking soda and salt, mix well.
  6. Using two spoons, take a spoonful of dough, transfer from one spoon to the other to make a rough ball, then scrape on to tray.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes, or until cookies are light brown.
  8. Transfer to wire rack to cool. Once completely cool, ice the using a butter knife (no need to be picky, coz we’re doing rustic, yea? Yea).

For the icing:

  1. In a medium bowl combine citrus zests, juices, melted butter and sea salt.
  2. Whisk in icing sugar until well combined and smooth.

Quantity: Makes 24 large or 36 normal size cookies.

Healthy? 155 for a normal size cookies, or 235 for a larger one.

Storage: Store in airtight container.

Polenta in a fight to the death

Lemon polenta biscuits

Five reasons why polenta would beat you in a fight TO THE DEATH!

  1. Stealth: almost impossible to find in the supermarket and never in the same place twice. Will it be with the polish food? In the Jewish section? I’ve seen it with the pasta and the flour. No one knows.
  2. Camouflage: it’s cornbread, no, it’s a pizza, no, it’s a deep fried side, then while you’re off to get a napkin it’s GONE!
  3. Skills: Polenta can easily fluff up with a bit of hot water, but in a biscuit can keep its form and stay crunchy. Even though it’s baked. Brilliant.
  4. Alliances: Vegetarians, tick. Coeliacs (in it’s basic form), tick. Unsuspecting children, tick.
  5. You will underestimate it: derived from grain mush, classed as peasant food, even called gruel, it knows how to play down play it’s abilities until it’s too late for you…

When I get in to something I really get into something. And lately I’ve been reading the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. I’ve polished off two books in seven days and am just starting the third.

Consequently my entire being has been overtaken with thoughts of terrible fights to the death, corrupt governments and evil survivor style games. I’ve walked in to people in the tube in my refusal to put my kindle down and cooked a whole risotto while reading.

Considering I usually cover my eyes during surgery scenes in Grey’s Anatomy, I’m shocked at myself.

And as far as polenta goes. I’m just saying. Watch your back.

I modified this recipe from a little unknown chef called Jamie Oliver.

Now if you excuse me, I have a book to read.

Just a side note, a week after publishing this I finished the series. As I say in this post I was really taken in by the first book and beginning of the second. But in this bloggers’ humble opinion, the third book completely let down the series. But in the words of Ben Folds “some guy on the net says I suck, and he should know he’s got his own blog…”

So make up your own mind!

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups medium non-instant polenta or yellow cornmeal
170 grams (1 1/2 sticks or 6 ounces) softened butter
3/4 cup sugar
2/3 cup flour
2 tablespoons finely grated lemon zest
Pinch of salt
2 eggs

Method
Note: the below method is from the original Jamie Oliver recipe. I just mixed it by hand (didn’t use a food processor) and never chilled it in the fridge. It was fine.

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°. Line several baking sheets with greaseproof paper.
  2. In a food processor, combine the polenta with the butter, sugar, flour, orange zest and salt and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal.
  3. Add the eggs and pulse just until the dough comes together. Transfer the dough to a bowl and refrigerate until slightly firm, about 1 hour.
  4. Using two teaspoons, drop slightly rounded teaspoons of the dough onto the prepared baking sheets about 2 inches apart. They will spread, so make sure you give them space.
  5. Bake the biscuits for 15 minutes, or until golden around the edges and on the bottoms.
  6. Let the cookies cool on the sheets for 5 minutes, then transfer them to wire racks to cool completely. Makes 36.

Healthy: 80 calories a biscuit.

Gluten free: swap out the flour and it is.

Storage: The cookies can be stored in an airtight container for 1 week or frozen for 1 month.

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